Mississippi University for Women v. Hogan

In Mississippi University for Women v. Hogan (1982), the U.S. Supreme Court explored the applicability of the Fourteenth Amendment’s Equal Protection Clause within the context of admissions and gender.

McLaurin v. Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education

McLaurin v. Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education (1950) was one of the key cases that invalidated intra-and interinstitution racial segregation in colleges and universities that helped to pave the way for Brown v. Board of Education, Topeka (1954).

Locke v. Davey

Locke v. Davey (2004) concerned the question of whether a state scholarship program violated the Free Exercise Clause of the First Amendment when, in accordance with a state constitutional provision, it explicitly barred funding for students pursuing degrees in theology.

Lehnert v. Ferris Faculty Association

At issue in Lehnert v. Ferris Faculty Association (1991) was whether the union representing faculty members at a college could compel dissenting members in an agency shop to subsidize legislative lobbying and other political activities not directly related to standard collective bargaining activities such as contract negotiation and grievance adjudication.

Kimel v. Florida Board of Regents

Kimel v. Florida Board of Regents (2000) is a landmark U.S. Supreme Court case dealing with congressional ability to abrogate the sovereign immunity of states from lawsuits charging violation of the Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA), a federal statute that protects workers over the age of 40 from discrimination.

Hunt v. McNair

At issue in Hunt v. McNair (1973) was the constitutionality of a program in South Carolina that provided support for religious institutions of higher learning.

Healy v. James

Often seen as the analogue in public higher education to Tinker v. Des Moines Independent Community School District (1969), the Supreme Court’s decision in Healy v. James (1972) differs in four significant respects.

Grutter v. Bollinger

Grutter v. Bollinger (2003) is a landmark judgment of the U.S. Supreme Court that together with its companion case, Gratz v. Bollinger, clarifies the circumstances under which college and university officials may consider race in admissions actions.